Tag Archives | education

Video Friday: Quadruple Feature Thanks to CorporateAffairs.tv

BrocRomanekBroc Romanek‘s CorporateAffairs.tv has started with a bang and plenty of early content in the form of brief videos that even those of us with attention deficit disorder can watch without missing a beat. Some in the ‘entertainment’ category are not so much for me. Still, it is great to see Broc and friends having fun. We’re too often in jobs or situations where there is far too little of that.

In the education category, a couple of my favorites include Birth of the Securities Act of 1933 and Shareholder Proposals: Who Submits Them? Continue Reading →

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Video Friday: Brian Cheffins on Comparative Corporate Governance

Brian R. Cheffins

Brian R. Cheffins

In 2012 Cambridge University launched a Masters degree in Corporate Law (the MCL), which offers students the opportunity to engage in detailed study of the legal and regulatory framework within which companies are governed and financed.

The MCL, a full-time nine-month program, is taught by the Cambridge Law Faculty’s team of corporate lawyers, widely recognized as one of the strongest in the corporate law field. The MCL, the first entirely new degree in Law to be established by Cambridge University since the nineteenth century, has been designed to combine Continue Reading →

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Audio Friday: Robert A. G. Monks Shares Corporate Governance Resources

Robert Monks

I’ve received praise before: CII said my petition to the SEC on proxy access “re-energized” the debate on that subject, Lexis-Nexis subscribers listed my site among the top 25 business blogs and the NACD put me on a list of “people to watch.”

However, never have I felt so honored as when I heard Bob Monks publicly list my website (corpgov.net) and my twitter account (corpgovnet) among resources worth following. If I were an actor, it would be like getting acknowledgement from Daniel Day-Lewis and Meryl Streep! And to top it off, to be in such company as those other resources Bob mentions! Wow! 2013 is starting out rather nicely. I’d better ask my wife to give me a smack, so my head doesn’t get too big. Continue Reading →

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Corporate Governance Guide for Journalists

The International Finance Corporation (IFC), a member of the World Bank Group, in conjunction with the International Center for Journalists, has produced  A Guide to Reporting on Corporate Governance designed for reporters and editors with experience covering business and finance. The goal is to help journalists develop stories that examine how companies are governed, and spot events that may have serious consequences for the company’s survival, shareholders and stakeholders. Continue Reading →

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Free Stanford Online Fall Class – Startup Boards: Advanced Entrepreneurship

This is an advanced entrepreneurship class, designed for teams who have already started a company or are seriously thinking about starting a company. So, don’t think just anyone will be accepted to this high-powered but free class. They encourage teams to take this class together, since much of the work will be focused on working with your board to make real progress on the most Continue Reading →
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Review: Trust & Control in HRM

Trust and Human Resource Management, edited by Rosalind Searle and Denise Skinner highlight trust as key to human resource management (HRM) from pre-entry to post-employment. The collection will be of great value to academics in the HR field and to practitioners interested in enhancing trust levels in their organizations.

Trust has long been associated with organizational effectiveness, efficiency and performance that can more easily grow in a climate of high motivation, Continue Reading →

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Corporate Director Qualifications: Minimal

To be a company director, you need to be over 18, not insane (or at least found to be insane by a judge), and not bankrupt. That’s it. You can sit on a major board of directors, and not know anything about the company, its industry, or even know how to read a financial statement.

When you see an accountant, a doctor, an engineer or a lawyer, that person has a rigorous code of professional practice with which he or she must comply, ongoing professional Continue Reading →

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L'Apel: Democratic Capitalism at Risk

Recently, ICGN held their annual conference in Paris. From the Twitter feed, it appears I missed a good one. (see ICGN Via Twitter) I’ve already mentioned Jon Lukomnik’s appeal to look again at the idea that shareowners’ interests and executives’ can be aligned through compensation strategies.

I think one origin of our errors was revising the tax code so that executive compensation above $1 million is only a tax deductible expense if performance based. The result has been, as Lukominik observes, that compensation plans have taken on the characteristics of “a slot machine: They pull a lever and three years later out comes a trickle of coins or a fountain of folding money.” This is a topic worthy of much discussion.

Another truthsayer at the conference was Robert A.G. Monks, whose L’Appel can be read as quickly as fast food but provides nutritional value of a much higher order. Bob lays out a number of observations. I’ll just list a few: Continue Reading →

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Corporate Director's Guidebook, Sixth Edition

I haven’t read the new Guidebook but I see that Corporate Counsel invited Weil, Gotshal & Manges partner Holly Gregory, who co-chaired the committee that authored the book talk about it with Spencer Smul of Estee Lauder and Lynn Stout of UCLA School of Law who did not.

Asked about what’s been preserved from prior edition, Stout said the equivalent of “Directorship for Dummies.” Smul referred to the popular chapter, “Joining a Board of Directors.”

Asked what was most useful about the new version, Stout points to provisions outlining legal, operational, and reputational risk. Smul agreed, and added he liked the new appendices and resources for additional information.

The most important new information for in-house lawyers for Stout was addressing:

what it means to owe a duty to the corporation and its shareholders. There is a tendency, especially in the business media, to assume that owing a duty to the shareholders is the same thing as maximizing share price. I think the Guidebook does a good job of making the very basic point that the concept of shareholder value is in many ways a fiction because different shareholders have different values. Some are focused on short-term stock price, some on long-term returns, some shareholders are diversified, some have social or political interests, and some do not.

(more at A How-To Guide For Corporate Boards And Counsel, Connecticut Law Tribune, 7/25/2011)

 

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Post-Modern Portfolio Theory: IRRC Research Award Available

The IRRC Institute announced a competition for research that examines the interaction of the real economy with investment theory. Two papers – one academic and one practitioner – will receive the new “IRRC Institute Research Award” along with a $10,000 award. Of course, we would like both prizes to go to CorpGov.net readers. One of many books you might want to read in preparing your paper is Corporate Valuation for Portfolio Investment: Analyzing Assets, Earnings, Cash Flow, Stock Price, Governance, and Special Situations by Robert A. G. Monks and Alexandra Reed Lajoux.

The following panel of renowned judges with broad finance and investment experience will carefully review submissions and select two winning papers: Continue Reading →

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